White Rose Governing Public and Private Security

UNEVEN SECURITY AND THE UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES OF SECURITY

The threat to civil liberties with increasing security measures Information sharing and the misuse of data – impacts on privacy Uneven surveillance (e.g. Project Champion in Birmingham).

States of exception and consequences for citizens.

The uneven impacts of securitisation on different groups e.g. ethnic minorities (heterogeneity within), women, young people.

Detention and immigration

GEOGRAPHIES OF SECURITY

Key locations and contested places where security emerges and is accepted/not accepted – e.g. screening at airports is accepted as normal but would not be viable at train stations.

The interface of security and everyday life.

Urban security and insecurity.

The governance of different neighbourhoods.

WHY GOVERN?

Questions about who we are thinking of when we speak of ‘governance’.

Can security be conceptualised and practised as a public good?

Plural policing forms and consequences.

TECHNOLOGIES OF SECURITY

Databases, information sharing, security processes and its porous boundaries.

Co-operation/non-co-operation between countries Electronic borders

Use of biometric data and its consequences.

COMPARATIVE SECURITY

The changing context within and between states.

Different political economies of security at the nation-state level and using the city as a unit of empirical comparison across countries.

Micro and macro level comparisons – local and global.

Cultural dimensions of security.

RESPONSES TO SECURITY

Citizens who contest security and the outcomes.

Resistance and acceptability of security: privacy and normalisation

The public as producers of security

United Nations resolutions –e.g. anti-terror lists (Security Council resolution 1373).

Discourses of security – Changes to how we conceptualise security – e.g. external and internal security, ‘home-grown’ terror and socio-political responses to threat.

Conceptualising ‘risk’ in response to security.

Security regulation and regulatory frameworks – uneven practices for private and public security.

GOVERNING PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECURITY IN EUROPE

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